Transnational and Cross Cultural Marketing

Course ID
MDG 504
Level
Undergraduate
Program
BMS
Semester
Fifth
Credits
6.0
Paper Type
DSE – Global Business
Method
Lecture & Tutorial

Unique Paper Code: 61017919

A. Identify and understand the various cultural and regional variables (and their degree of impact) and how they impact businesses in the short-term and long-term future; what companies can do to utilise these variables and mitigate their impact.
B. Understand the nuances of cross-cultural and cross-border activities such as advertising, pricing, supply chain management, market entry, branding and customization etc.
C. Anticipate changes in the operating environment of a business on a global level.
D. Read, understand, relate and be able to utilise/implement the ideas of great thinkers and researchers in the field of global marketing.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • Identify the key skills that a (good) business (cross-cultural) manager should have.
  • Understand how the business environment affects a business; articulate the various factors and how they affect a business.
  • Understand the various tools and actions that a business has and can undertake to find (or identify or utilise) a beneficial situation within a given operating (business) environment.
  • Understand how businesses achieve growth (with focus on international expansion, operating in multiple markets, new business opportunities, market analysis etc.)
  • Articulate the various support systems that a business can use and access (governmental interventions and policies; operating market level advantages such as access to capital, quality and quantity of labour available; availability of land; size, purchasing power and buying behaviour of the target market; MNC level advantages; etc.)

Course Contents

Unit I
Unit II
Unit III
Unit IV

Unit I (2 Weeks)

Introduction; Reasons behind international expansion; Historical Transnational trade; types of MNCs; Stages of International Exposure; Marketing across cultures and countries, Using Social Media tools.

References:

Cateora, Philip R. & Graham, John L.: International Marketing, Tata McGraw Hill. | Chapters 1, 2 and 12

Joshi, Rakesh Mohan: International Marketing, Oxford University Press. | Chapters 1, 2, 7 and 21

Unit II (3 Weeks)

National-level variables, regional trading blocs; Physical variables, Geographic distance, Grouping of industries in specific areas/regions, Environment specific impacts, Distribution of Natural Resources; Cultural Variables, Impact on doing business (Institutions, Distance, Power, Decision Making, People Management, Delegation, Corruption, Quality Benchmarks Etc.), Gender biases, Festivals, Buying Behaviour, interaction with social and governmental institutions, cultivating suppliers and retail channels; PESTEL (focus on Political and Social factors); Porter’s Diamond Model; Positioning; Protectionism and its impact on international trade.

References:

Cateora, Philip R. & Graham, John L.: International Marketing, Tata McGraw Hill. | Chapters 4, 5, 6, 7, 10 and 11

Joshi, Rakesh Mohan: International Marketing, Oxford University Press. | Chapters 3, 4 and 5

Unit III (3 Weeks)

Porter’s Five Forces Model; Ghemawat’s CAGE framework; Globalisation; Demographics and Segmentation; Assessing Market Potential, How markets behave, Selling in specific markets (Developed, Developing, Post-Communist); “Right” Market to enter and “Right” Time to enter; What (mis-selling, outdated products), Where, Why, and How are we selling; Customer needs (of the non home market); Packaging; Selling to and in emerging markets, unique customer needs, upward social mobility, Tier 1, 2, 3 and 4 customers and markets, purchasing power and willingness to pay; Concerns and issues with available market analysis tools.

References:

Cateora, Philip R. & Graham, John L.: International Marketing, Tata McGraw Hill. | Chapters 8, 9, 13 and 14

Joshi, Rakesh Mohan: International Marketing, Oxford University Press. | Chapters 6, 8, 9, 10 and 11

Unit IV (4 Weeks)

Strategic (and global) Alliances; Global level of competition; Product Development; People concerns (Manufacturing facilities, quality of the available workforce) E-Commerce and Changing Marketing Paradigms; Supply Chain as a source of International Advantages; Managing International Sales (Channels and Logistics); International Advertising and Promotions; Pricing for international markets, Pricing wars (War Chests), Approaches – Full- cost v/s Variable, Skimming v/s Penetration (non numeric), value of money, factors influencing pricing; Implementing a Global Marketing Strategy. Support Mechanisms for Exports and International Trade, International Payment Methods, Managing Risks in International Trade.

References:

Cateora, Philip R. & Graham, John L.: International Marketing, Tata McGraw Hill. | Chapters 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19

Joshi, Rakesh Mohan: International Marketing, Oxford University Press. | Chapters 12, 13, 14, 16, 18, 19, 20 and 22

Additional Information

Text Books


Cateora, Philip R. & Graham, John L.: International Marketing, Tata McGraw Hill.
Joshi, Rakesh Mohan: International Marketing, Oxford University Press.

Additional Readings


Keega, Warren J.: Global Marketing Management, Prentice Hall India.
Muhlbache, Hans: International Marketing-A Global Perspective, Cengage Learning.
Varshney & Bhattacharya: International Marketing Management, Sultan Chand & Sons.

Teaching Learning Process


Case studies
Relevant and important articles from academic linked journals in the domain of Management such as Harvard Business Review, Strategy+Management and MIT Sloan Management Review among others of a comparable quality.
Research reports put out by management bodies such as McKinsey and Company, KPMG and Deloitte among others.
Classroom discussions based on points 1-3 and other parts of the course contents.
Classroom presentations by the students on teacher assigned topics.

Assessment Methods

The total assessment of the course is for 100 marks and would be split as follows:
A. Semester end exam = 75 marks
B. Attendance = 5 marks
C. Internal = 20 marks (8 – class participation; 7 – term paper; 5 – class presentation)

Keywords

Cross-cultural; Trans-national; International; Cultural; Cultural barriers; Regional; International business environment.

Disclaimer: Details on this page are subject to change as per University of Delhi guidelines. For latest update in this regard please refer to the University of Delhi website here.

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