Environmental Science

Course ID
Level
Undergraduate
Program
BMS
Semester
First
Credits
4.0
Paper Type
Ability Enhancement Compulsory
Method
Lecture

Unique Paper Code: 72182801

The Compulsory course on Environmental Studies at Undergraduate level (AECC-I) aims to train students to cater to the need for ecological citizenship through development of a strong foundation on the critical linkages between ecology-society-economy.

Learning Outcomes:

The course will empower the undergraduate students by helping them to:

  • Gain in-depth knowledge on natural processes and resources that sustain life and govern economy.
  • Understand the consequences of human actions on the web of life, global economy, and quality of human life.
  • Develop critical thinking for shaping strategies (scientific, social, economic, administrative, and legal) for environmental protection, conservation of biodiversity, environmental equity, and sustainable development.
  • Acquire values and attitudes towards understanding complex environmental-economic- social challenges, and active participation in solving current environmental problems and preventing the future ones.
  • Adopt sustainability as a practice in life, society, and industry.

Course Contents

Unit I
Unit II
Unit III
Unit IV

Introduction to Environmental Studies (2 lectures)

  • Multidisciplinary nature of environmental studies; components of environment: atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere
  • Scope and importance; Concept of sustainability and sustainable development; Brief history of environmentalism

References:

1. Raven, P.H, Hassenzahl, D.M., Hager, M.C, Gift, N.Y., and Berg, L.R. (2015). Environment, 8th Edition. Wiley Publishing, USA. Chapter 1 (Pages: 1-17); Chapter 2 (Pages: 22-23); Chapter 3 (Pages: 40, 41); Chapter 4 (Pages: 64, 66).

2. Singh, J.S., Singh, S.P., and Gupta, S.R. (2017). Ecology, Environmental Science and
Conservation. S. Chand Publishing, New Delhi. Chapter 1 (Page: 3-28).

Ecosystems (6 lectures)

Definition and concept of Ecosystem

Structure of ecosystem (biotic and abiotic components); Functions of Ecosystem: Physical (energy flow), Biological (food chains, food web, ecological succession), and Biogeochemical (nutrient cycling) processes. Concepts of productivity, ecological pyramids and homeostasis

Types of Ecosystems: Tundra, Forest, Grassland, Desert, Aquatic (ponds, streams, lakes, rivers, oceans, estuaries); importance and threats with relevant examples from India

Ecosystem services (Provisioning, Regulating, Cultural, and Supporting); Ecosystem preservation and conservation strategies; Basics of Ecosystem restoration

References:

  1. Odum, E.P., Odum, H.T., and Andrews, J. (1971). Fundamentals of Ecology. Saunders, Philadelphia, USA. Chapter 1 (Pages: 1-16); Chapter 2 (Pages: 18-76); Chapter 10 (Pages: 414-458).
  2. Raven, P.H, Hassenzahl, D.M., Hager, M.C, Gift, N.Y., and Berg, L.R. (2015). Environment, 9th Edition. Wiley Publishing, USA. Chapter 3 (Pages: 38-52); Chapter 4 (Pages: 53-62); Chapter 5 (Pages: 100-103); Chapter 6 (Pages: 106-128).
  3. Singh, J.S., Singh, S.P., and Gupta, S.R. (2017). Ecology, Environmental Science and Conservation. S. Chand Publishing, New Delhi. Chapter 13 (Pages: 307-323); Chapter 18 (Pages: 420-442); Chapter 28 (Pages: 747-769).

Natural Resources (8 lectures)

  • Land resources: Minerals, soil, agricultural crops, natural forest products, medicinal plants, and forest-based industries and livelihoods; Land cover, land use change, land degradation, soil erosion, and desertification; Causes of deforestation; Impacts of mining and dam building on environment, forests, biodiversity, and tribal communities
  • Water resources: Natural and man-made sources; Uses of water; Over exploitation of surface and ground water resources; Floods, droughts, and international &interstate conflicts over water
  • Energy resources: Renewable and non-renewable energy sources; Use of alternate energy sources; Growing energy needs; Energy contents of coal, petroleum, natural gas and bio gas; Agro-residues as a biomass energy source
  • Case studies: Contemporary Indian issues related to mining, dams, forests, energy, etc (e.g., National Solar Mission, Cauvery river water conflict, Sardar Sarovar dam, Chipko movement, Appiko movement, Tarun Bharat Sangh, etc)

References:

  1. Gadgil, M. and Guha, R. (1993). This Fissured Land: An Ecological History of India. University of California Press, Berkeley, USA. (pp. 1-245).
  2. McCully, P. (1996). Rivers no more: the environmental effects of dams, In: Silenced Rivers: The Ecology and Politics of Large Dams, Zed Books, New York, USA. Page. 29-64.
  3. Raven, P.H, Hassenzahl, D.M., Hager, M.C, Gift, N.Y. and Berg, L.R. (2015). Environment, 9th Edition. Wiley Publishing, USA. Chapters 10, 11, 12, 13 (Pages: 180-263); Chapter 14 (Pages: 272-275); Chapter 15 (Pages: 286-289).
  4. Singh, J.S., Singh, S.P. and Gupta, S.R. (2017). Ecology, Environmental Science and Conservation. S. Chand Publishing, New Delhi. Chapter 25 (Pages: 623-663).

Biodiversity and Conservation (8 lectures)

  • Definition of Biodiversity; Levels of biological diversity: genetic, species and ecosystem diversity
  • India as a mega-biodiversity nation; Biogeographic zones of India; Biodiversity hotspots; Endemic and endangered species of India; IUCN Red list criteria and categories
  • Value of biodiversity: Ecological, economic, social, ethical, aesthetic, and informational values of biodiversity with examples; sacred groves and their importance with examples
  • Threats to biodiversity: Habitat loss, degradation, and fragmentation; Poaching of wildlife; Man-wildlife conflicts; Biological invasion with emphasis on Indian biodiversity; Current mass extinction crisis
  • Biodiversity conservation strategies: in-situ and ex-situ methods of conservation; National Parks, Wildlife Sanctuaries, and Biosphere reserves; Keystone, Flagship, Umbrella, and Indicator species; Species reintroduction and translocation
  • Case studies: Contemporary Indian wildlife and biodiversity issues, movements, and projects (e.g., Project Tiger, Project Elephant, Vulture breeding program, Project Great Indian Bustard, Crocodile conservation project, Silent Valley movement, Save Western Ghats movement, etc)

References:

  1. Primack, R.B. (2014). Essentials of Conservation Biology, Oxford University Press, USA. Page. 1-536.
  2. Raven, P.H, Hassenzahl, D.M., Hager, M.C, Gift, N.Y. and Berg, L.R. (2015). Environment, 9th Edition. Wiley Publishing, USA. Chapter 5 (Pages: 97-99); Chapter 16 (Pages: 299-318).
  3. Singh, J.S., Singh, S.P. and Gupta, S.R. (2017). Ecology, Environmental Science and Conservation. S. Chand Publishing, New Delhi. Chapters 24 (Pages: 599-690); Chapter 26 (Pages: 664-714).

Additional Information

Text Books


Robbins Stephen P and Judge T.A. (2017) Organisational Behaviour, 17th Ed. Pearson.

Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter (2017) Management. 13th Ed. Pearson.

Kaul Vijay Kumar (2012). Business Organization & Management – Text and Cases, Pearson.

Teaching Learning Process

Lectures, Presentations, Role plays, Case studies, Term paper on a given topic

Assessment Methods

Internal assessment 25 marks
Written exam 75 marks

Keywords

Planning, Organizing, Controlling, Departmentation, Leadership, Motivation, Change, Organization development

Disclaimer: Details on this page are subject to change as per University of Delhi guidelines. For latest update in this regard please refer to the University of Delhi website here.

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